Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

  • Why you should grow it
    • High in Vitamin C and potassium
    • Crunchy like a pear, you can eat it raw or cooked
    • Of the cabbage family – commonly called German turnip
    • Great addition to salads
    • Use as a substitute in recipes for broccoli or cabbage

 

  • How to start seeds
    • Plant in well-drained soil in full sun
    • Plant out in the spring and late summer, try not to plant in the heat of summer, they need cooler temperatures to grow to full size
    • Plant under taller plants to ensure that the soil is cooled
    • Sow seeds 5mm deep
    • Needs 45-60 days until mature
    • 1 inch apart and about 4 cm down
    • Start indoors during the heat of summer and plant out when the weather cools

 

  • Tips for growth
    • Plant April to mid-May, mid-July to early august
    • Fertilize soil before planting out
    • Companion plants include beets, celery, herbs, onions, potatoes. Do not plant with pole beans, strawberries or tomatoes.
    • Not good for containers as they root deeply
    • Keep consistently moist, they can become woody if not watered regularly
    • Mulch when the kohlrabi a bit grown to prevent evaporation and insulation against the heat or cold

 

  • Harvesting
    • Kohlrabi is ready for harvest when stems reach 2 to 3 inches in diameter
    • Don’t let it get too big, like zucchini, when left too long they will start to get woody
    • Cut from the base
    • Treat the leaves like cabbage
    • You can harvest the leaves through the season, just don’t take all of them, the plant needs to be able to keep growing

  • Saving Seeds
    • Kohlrabi are biennial, meaning they go to seed the year after you plant it
    • They are also of the cabbage family, meaning they can easily cross with cauliflower, cabbage, broccoli etc
    • Ensure that you isolate it from other varieties when it goes to seed
    • The seed pods will turn brown when they are ready
    • Pull off and let fully dry in the sun
    • Label and store in a cool, dark place